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Method To Select Eggs With The Best Chance

Catherine McDiarmid-Watt | Tuesday, March 19, 2019 | 0 comments

Image: Perfect Eggs, by Andreas Lischka on Pixabay

A research team supervised by Universite Laval scientist Marc-Andre Sirard has identified genetic markers that allow the selection of eggs with the best chance of leading to successful pregnancy after in vitro fertilization (IVF).

This finding could both increase the success rate of single embryo transfer and diminish the risk of multiple pregnancies.

The details of the method developed by the researchers, for which an international patent application has been filed, are explained on the website of the scientific journal Human Reproduction.

Eggs recovered in the course of the IVF process are surrounded by follicular cells removed before the actual fertilization procedure begins. While in the ovaries, these cells and the eggs are in very close interaction, explains Sirard.

A first experiment we conducted on bovine follicular cells led us to believe these cells might possess specific markers that would be able to give us information about the quality of an egg.

With the help of 40 women recruited in a fertility clinic, researchers compared follicular cells surrounding eggs ultimately led to successful pregnancies - i.e. good eggs - to cells surrounding ovules which did not result in pregnancy.

This comparison led to the identification of five genes expressed more abundantly in follicular cells surrounding good eggs.

Currently, the way to assess which embryos are to be transferred into a woman's uterus is based on visible criteria such as appearance and division rate.

At least 30% of embryos that look normal through visual examination nonetheless show chromosome abnormalities, explains Professor Sirard, illustrating the limits of this type of assessment.

The method developed by Sirard's team makes it possible to objectively select ovules which have the best chance of success without altering the integrity of the embryos.

This new genomic tool could also solve an ethical problem confronting both fertility clinic doctors and the people who consult them: In order to increase the chances of pregnancy, many embryos are implanted simultaneously into the woman in the hope that at least one will survive.

This procedure along with improved IVF techniques has led to an increase in multiple pregnancies.

Even if doctors now tend to transfer fewer embryos, multiple pregnancies still occur in 30% of couples who resort to IVF in North America and 23% in European couples.

By selecting the embryo with the best potential, it would be possible to limit the number of embryos transferred, and thus the number of multiple pregnancies, while maintaining good success rates, concludes Marc-André Sirard.


Source: Jean-François Huppé, Université Laval
MedicalNewsToday.com






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Catherine

About Catherine: I am mom to three grown sons, two grandchildren and two rescue dogs. After years of raising my boys as a single mom, I remarried a wonderful man who had never had a child of his own. Unexpectedly, I found myself pregnant at 49!
Sadly we lost that precious baby at 8 weeks, and decided to try again. Five more losses, turned down for donor egg, foster care and adoption due to my age and losses - we have accepted that there will be no more babies in our house.

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