Amazon.com lists over 8,000 items under the search term "fertility"
Image: Finding the perfect egg. Photo credit: Maja on FreeImages
Photo credit: Finding the perfect egg, by Maja
In a groundbreaking study,Yale School of Medicine researchers and colleagues at the University of Oxford have identified the chromosomal make-up of a human egg.

This discovery may soon allow them to avoid using abnormal -- or aneuploid -- eggs during infertility treatments, and instead to pick eggs healthy enough for a successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle.

The results are published in the May issue of the journal Human Reproduction.

Only a few oocytes (eggs) per IVF treatment cycle are able to produce a pregnancy because many eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes.

If the egg is missing a chromosome or has an extra chromosome, this is referred to as aneuploidy. This problem increases as women age.

Oocytes are surrounded by cells, called cumulus cells, which regulate and assist the process of egg maturation.

In this study, Yale Fertility Center director Dr. Pasquale Patrizio, and Dagan Wells of the University of Oxford studied genes expressed in the cumulus cells.

They were able to identify a set of genes less active in cells, which is associated with abnormal eggs.

They characterized two genes -- SPSB2 and TP5313 -- and found the expression of these genes was consistently underrepresented in cumulus cells surrounding abnormal eggs, while these same genes were normally expressed in eggs with the correct number of chromosomes.

The identification of these genes in cumulus cells can serve as a novel, non-invasive marker to identify abnormal oocytes and thus ultimately improve IVF success rates, said Patrizio, professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Yale.

We can use cumulus cells surrounding the eggs to gain insight into the health of an egg. These cells are now able to inform us about the chromosomal makeup of an egg. This can help us know if it is the 'right egg' to be fertilized and produce a baby.

This finding opens up the possibility of a safe, effective, and inexpensive way of identifying healthy eggs, potentially lowering the risks of miscarriage and Down syndrome, said Wells.

By conducting these tests before eggs are fertilized, ethical concerns about an analysis of human embryos are avoided.

Other authors on the study include Elpida Fragouli, Amy E. Lager, and Umit A. Kayisli.

Wells is supported by the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford; the work was also supported by a grant from Gema Diagnostics, Inc.

Story Source: The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Yale University. The original article was written by Karen N. Peart.

Journal Reference: Alteration of gene expression in human cumulus cells as a potential indicator of oocyte aneuploidy


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Insider's Guide to Egg Donation: A Compassionate and Comprehensive Guide for All Parents-to-Be, by Wendie Wilson-Miller and Erika Napoletano. Publisher: Demos Health; 1 edition (May 15, 2012)The Insider's Guide to Egg Donation: A Compassionate and Comprehensive Guide for All Parents-to-Be
by Wendie Wilson-Miller and Erika Napoletano

-- In their search for alternative means for building a family, those who face infertility turn to the nearly 500 reproductive specialty clinics across the United States.

While egg donors enter into the picture for a variety of reasons, every reason has the same desired result: a family to call one’s own.

Same-sex and single-by-choice parents are more prevalent than ever in the fertility industry, and there is no definitive, up-to-date guide to help families of all types approach egg donation, especially these niche groups. Resources are fragmented, true regardless of the family structure.

The Insider's Guide to Egg Donation is the first how-to-handbook helping families of all types navigate the less talked about but widely practiced egg donor landscape with a warm and friendly tone, giving those in search of a different kind of stork the answers and information they need as they begin to research family-building options.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 280 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Insider's Guide to Egg Donation

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading The Insider's Guide to Egg Donation on your Kindle in under a minute!

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The importance of folate, zinc and antioxidants in the pathogenesis and prevention of subfertility
 Subfertility is defined as the failure to conceive after 1 year of regular, unprotected intercourse with the same partner.

Approximately 10–17% of all couples experience primary or secondary subfertility at some time during their reproductive life.

UV radiation destroys folic acid, a precursor for folate, the lack of which may result in birth defects.

Current treatments of subfertile couples are usually empiric, as the true cause of subfertility often remains unknown.

Therefore, we outline the role of nutritional and biochemical factors in reproduction and subfertility.

A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Science Direct and bibliographies of published work with both positive and negative results.

The studies showed folate has a role in spermatogenesis.

In female reproduction, folate is also important for oocyte quality and maturation, implantation, placentation, fetal growth and organ development.

Zinc has also been implicated in testicular development, sperm maturation and testosterone synthesis.

In females, zinc plays a role in sexual development, ovulation and the menstrual cycle.

Both folate and zinc have antioxidant properties which counteract reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Thiols, such as glutathione, balance the levels of ROS produced by spermatozoa and influence DNA compaction and the stability and motility of spermatozoa.

Oocyte maturation, ovulation, luteolysis and follicle atresia are also affected by ROS.

After fertilization, glutathione is important for sperm nucleus decondensation and pronucleus formation.

Folate, zinc, ROS and thiols affect apoptosis, which is important for sperm release, regulation of follicle atresia, degeneration of the corpus luteum and endometrial shedding.

Therefore, the concentrations of these nutrients may have substantial effects on reproduction.

In conclusion, nutritional and biochemical factors affect biological processes in male and female reproduction. Further research should identify pathways that may lead to improvements in care and treatment of subfertility.

Read more: The importance of folate, zinc and antioxidants in the pathogenesis and prevention of subfertility


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Ready: Why Women Are Embracing The New Later Motherhood, by Elizabeth Gregory. Publisher: Basic Books (December 25, 2007)Ready: Why Women Are Embracing The New Later Motherhood
by Elizabeth Gregory

-- Over the past three decades, skyrocketing numbers of women have chosen to start their families in their late thirties and early forties.

In 2005, ten times as many women had their first child between the ages of 35 and 39 as in 1975, and thirteen times as many had their first between 40 and 44.

Women now have the option to define for themselves when they're ready for a family, rather than sticking to a schedule set by social convention.

As a society, however, we have yet to come to terms with the phenomenon of later motherhood, and women who decide it makes sense for them to delay pregnancy often find themselves confronted with alarmist warnings about the dangers of waiting too long.

In Ready, Elizabeth Gregory tracks the burgeoning trend of new later motherhood and demonstrates for many women today, waiting for family works best.

She provides compelling evidence of the benefits of having children later -- by birth or by adoption.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 336 pages
Click to order/for more info: Ready

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Ready on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Here's a list of clinics in the UK which will treat women 45 or over.
Can't guarantee how accurate this info is, as it's several years old.

Birmingham Women's Hospital
The Fertility Centre is located on the second floor of our Women's hospital.
- providing a full range of services from diagnosis of infertility, to IVF and ICSI treatment, treatment with donated eggs or sperm, surrogacy, fertility preservation for a range of medical issues and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

BMI Priory Hospital
-- Donor insemination (DI), Embryo cryopreservation (freezing) and frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET), Intrauterine Insemination (IUI), Invitro fertilisation & embryo transfer (IVF), IVF and Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), Ovum and embryo donations, Surgical Sperm Recovery (e.g. Microsurgical Epididymal Sperm Aspiration MESA), Time lapse embryo monitoring system (Primo VisionTM)

Diana, Princess of Wales Centre for Reproductive Medicine
St Georges Hospital NHS Trust, 3rd Floor
Lanesborough Wing, Cranmer Terrace
London, SW17 0RE
50 years max, relationship 1 year minimum

Essex Fertility Centre
Holly House Hospital
High Road, Buckhurst Hill
Tel: 020 8505 3315
Clinical Director: Mr Michael Ah-Moye (1977)
One cycle of IVF: £ 2100
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 650
50 years max

Hartlepool General Hospital
Holdforth Road
Hartlepool, TS24 9SH
Tel: 01429 522 866
Clinical Director: Mr M Menabawey (1968)
One cycle of IVF: £ 2300
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 270
50 years for private patients if FSH level is less than 15 u/L

London Female and Male Fertility Centre
Highgate Private Hospital
17-19 View Road
London, N6 4DJ
Tel: 020 8347 5081
Clinical Director: Mr A Abdel Gadir (1972)One cycle of IVF: £ 1840
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 675
50 years max, minimum 6 months relationship, number of previous cycles and maternal weight may be considered in consultation

London Women's Clinic
113-115 Harley Street
London, W1N 1DG
Tel: 020 7487 5050
Clinical Director: Ms Jinan Bekir (1968)
One cycle of IVF: £ 2100
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 490
46 years max, 50 years for donated eggs

Maidstone Fertility Centre
Kent Medical Imaging
60 Churchill Square, King's Hill
West Malling, ME19 4DU
Tel: 01732 529 643
Clinical Director: Professor Ian Craft
One cycle of IVF: £ 1800
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 650 (1 insemination -2 insemination = £700)
55 years max, smokers encouraged to stop

Manchester Fertility Services
Manchester BUPA Hospital
Russell House, Russell Road
Whalley Range, M16 8AJ
Tel: 0161 862 9567
Clinical Director: Dr Brian A Lieberman (1965)
One cycle of IVF: £ 1990
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 420

Midland Fertility Services
3rd Floor, Centre House
Court Parade
Aldridge, WS9 8LT
Tel: 01922 455911
50 years - but dependent upon individual circumstances

St Jude's Clinic for Fertility and Gynaecology
The White House
194 Penn Road
Wolverhampton, WV3 0EQ
Tel: 01902 620 831
Clinical Director: Mr Jude Adeghe (1980)
One cycle of IVF: £ 1600
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 500
50 years max

The Cromwell IVF and Fertility Centre
Cromwell Hospital
Cromwell Road
London, SW5 0TU
Tel: 020 7460 5713
Clinical Director: Mr Eric Simons (1961)One cycle of IVF: £ 2850 (under review)
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 660
58 years max if using donor eggs

The Peninsular Centre for Reproductive Medicine
Exeter Fertility Clinic, Heavitree Hospital
Gladstone Road
Exeter, EX1 2ED
Tel: 01392 405 051
Clinical Director: Mr Jonathan H West (1978)
One cycle of IVF: £ 1868
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 370
50 years max, M 60 years max, minimum 1 year relationship, BMI within normal range

Washington Hospital Cromwell IVF and Fertility Unit
The BUPA Washington Hospital
Picktree Lane, Rickleton
Washington, NE38 9JZ
Tel: 0191 417 6463
One cycle of IVF: £ 2250
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 535
58 years max, stable heterosexual relationship required, egg donors must cease smoking 3 months before treatment, weight loss advised if BMI greater than 30

Winterbourne Fertility Centre
The Winterbourne Hospital
Herringston Road
Dorchester, DT1 2DR
Tel: 01305 263 252
Clinical Director: Mr Michael Dooley (1980)One cycle of IVF: £ 2490
One cycle of IUI W/Donor: £ 575
50 years max

Source: Can you please help me


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility, by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller. Publisher: Findhorn Press; Pap/DVD edition (October 7, 2011)The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility
by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller

-- Women who are trying to conceive will find a holistic approach in this hands-on manual.

Step-by-step guidelines help implement a three-part program — of yoga, hypoallergenic and anti-inflammatory nutrition, and stress-reduction techniques — to cleanse the body, mind, and spirit in preparation for pregnancy.

In addition, this program draws on cleansing methods from traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and has been specifically designed for women who are trying naturally or with assisted-reproduction plans.

Also based on new clinical research that suggests that gut health, chronic inflammation, and environmental toxins may be root causes of infertility, this important book offers all women a natural, holistic approach to readying the womb for a child.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Infertility Cleanse

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading The Infertility Cleanse on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.




Image: Homefield Grange RetreatWith new research suggesting being overweight is a contributory factor in long term conception and fertility problems in men, the 7 Day Detox Clinic from Homefield Grange is ideal for men looking to shift those extra pounds and begin their journey to a new, healthier lifestyle.

Working towards a healthier lifestyle is not something limited just to ladies looking for the body beautiful.

Looking after your body is something everybody needs to consider and weight loss for men is becoming a very serious issue.

Figures from the World Health Organization suggest 48% of male adults are obese and this impacts negatively on everything from their physical health to their fertility, as new research has discovered.

Reproductive experts at the University of Melbourne have just released research showing obesity can significantly affect the efficiency of sperm.

This new research shows that it's just not women who need to get in shape when trying to conceive, men need to be healthy too.

At Homefield Grange, the ultimate 7 Day Detox and Weight Loss Programme is designed to conquer those extra pounds and teach participants a healthier way to live.

Attending the programme at Homefield Grange gives participants a chance to enjoy the rural Nottinghamshire surroundings whilst working towards a fitter, healthier self.

The 7 day detox programme is filled with classes covering nutrition, exercise and more.

Daily exercise classes include non-impact sessions such as Yoga and Pilates, with specific fat-burning classes also scheduled.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility, by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller. Publisher: Findhorn Press; Pap/DVD edition (October 7, 2011)The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility
by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller

-- Women who are trying to conceive will find a holistic approach in this hands-on manual.

Step-by-step guidelines help implement a three-part program — of yoga, hypoallergenic and anti-inflammatory nutrition, and stress-reduction techniques — to cleanse the body, mind, and spirit in preparation for pregnancy.

In addition, this program draws on cleansing methods from traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and has been specifically designed for women who are trying naturally or with assisted-reproduction plans.

Also based on new clinical research that suggests that gut health, chronic inflammation, and environmental toxins may be root causes of infertility, this important book offers all women a natural, holistic approach to readying the womb for a child.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Infertility Cleanse

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading The Infertility Cleanse on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: 10 Celebrity moms pregnant over 40January 2008 -- Geena Davis did it. So did Emma Thompson and Susan Sarandon.

Now, Nicole Kidman is joining the swelling ranks of women who have their first baby after the age of 40.

Only a century ago the average life expectancy for women was about 50, so a 35-year-old would have been an ageing matriarch with grandchildren in tow.

But now one in seven babies in Australia is born to a woman older than that as thousands hit the snooze button on parenting.

Maturity can bring a satisfying career, a healthy bank balance and a well-rounded sense of self, but women who become pregnant later in life also have a much greater risk of miscarriages, ectopic pregnancies, and stillbirths.

Older women are also more likely to have induced labour, epidural anaesthesia, forceps or vacuum deliveries, and caesarean sections. They have a one in 100 chance of having a child with chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome.

A fertility specialist with IVF Australia, Michael Chapman, said yesterday that women aged 40 to 45 had a one in four chance of miscarrying.

Age and the miscarriage rate are linked because the older a woman gets, the older her eggs get. They become more fragile with age and have abnormalities, which can lead to miscarriage or disorders such as Down syndrome.

He said pregnant women in their 30s and 40s had a greater risk of hypertension and gestational diabetes, which often required intervention during labour.

One study showed first-time mothers older than 40 were 14 times more likely to have a caesarean than those under 30.

Most obstetricians encourage older women to have a caesarean section because their muscles are weaker and their tissues are less elastic, Dr Chapman said.

But the secretary of the NSW Midwives Association, Hannah Dahlen, said yesterday, women should not be deterred.

Older mothers are more likely to be educated and financially secure, more settled in themselves and more prepared to make the sacrifices required to be a mother, she said.

They are better able to negotiate care for their child, their children often do better in school, and it has also been shown in some studies women who have babies in their 40s live longer.

Read more: The risks - and rewards - when motherhood begins at 40


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF, by Rebecca Fett. Publisher: Franklin Fox Publishing LLC (March 25, 2014)It Starts with the Egg:
How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF
by Rebecca Fett

-- Whether you are trying to conceive naturally or through IVF, the quality of your eggs will have a powerful impact on how long it takes you to get pregnant and whether you face an increased risk of miscarriage.

Poor egg quality is emerging as the single most important cause of age-related infertility, recurrent miscarriage, and failed IVF cycles. It is also a major contributor to infertility in PCOS.

Based on a comprehensive investigation of a vast array of scientific research, It Starts with the Egg reveals a groundbreaking new approach for improving egg quality and fertility.

With a concrete strategy that includes minimizing exposure to toxins such as BPA and phthalates, choosing the right vitamins and supplements to safeguard developing eggs, and harnessing nutritional advice shown to boost IVF success rates, this book offers practical solutions that will help you get pregnant faster and deliver a healthy baby.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 304 pages
Click to order/for more info: It Starts with the Egg

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading It Starts with the Egg on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: When maternal age and number of previous miscarriages were taken into account, those women who were obese were shown to have a higher chance of a further miscarriage | Photo: PA
When maternal age and number of previous miscarriages
were taken into account, those women who were obese
were shown to have a higher chance of a further miscarriage | Photo: PA
Obese women run a greater risk of repeat miscarriages and should be warned to lose weight before they try and become pregnant again, according to a new study.

Researchers at St Mary's Hospital in London found obese women who had suffered one miscarriage had a significantly increased risk of a further miscarriage compared to those who were of a normal weight.

The 11-year study investigated the effect of body mass index (BMI) on unexplained recurrent miscarriages.

The women had their BMI measured and were placed into one of four categories: underweight; normal; overweight; and obese.

Read more: Obese women at greater risk of repeat miscarriages


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: It Starts with the Egg: How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF, by Rebecca Fett. Publisher: Franklin Fox Publishing LLC (March 25, 2014)It Starts with the Egg:
How the Science of Egg Quality Can Help You Get Pregnant Naturally, Prevent Miscarriage, and Improve Your Odds in IVF
by Rebecca Fett

-- Whether you are trying to conceive naturally or through IVF, the quality of your eggs will have a powerful impact on how long it takes you to get pregnant and whether you face an increased risk of miscarriage.

Poor egg quality is emerging as the single most important cause of age-related infertility, recurrent miscarriage, and failed IVF cycles. It is also a major contributor to infertility in PCOS.

Based on a comprehensive investigation of a vast array of scientific research, It Starts with the Egg reveals a groundbreaking new approach for improving egg quality and fertility.

With a concrete strategy that includes minimizing exposure to toxins such as BPA and phthalates, choosing the right vitamins and supplements to safeguard developing eggs, and harnessing nutritional advice shown to boost IVF success rates, this book offers practical solutions that will help you get pregnant faster and deliver a healthy baby.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 304 pages
Click to order/for more info: It Starts with the Egg

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading It Starts with the Egg on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Over 40 High FSH Success StoriesOn the Women Over 40 With High FSH message board, there is a post called the Over 40 Timeline.

It is a post containing the successes of the women from the Women Over 40 With High FSH board.

Whenever someone has a baby, they come back to add themselves to this post.

Many times though, the ladies are so busy after the birth they don't have time to come back and post (which is completely understandable), so this isn't a comprehensive list.

But still, the number of success cases is amazing.

It is a truly inspiring list.

I refer to it often when my spirits are in need of a lift, like now!

Some interesting points:

* The oldest person so far on the list is Annie from Finland, with a baby at 47 years old, and her highest FSH was 37.

* Highest FSH so far on the list is Toni, who clocked in at a FSH of 110.

Remember, this is just the ladies who used to post on this one message board. Such a small subset of everyone out there who was ever diagnosed with high FSH and are in their 40s!

Read more: *Over 40 Timeline* Updated


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Ready: Why Women Are Embracing The New Later Motherhood, by Elizabeth Gregory. Publisher: Basic Books (December 25, 2007)Ready: Why Women Are Embracing The New Later Motherhood
by Elizabeth Gregory

-- Over the past three decades, skyrocketing numbers of women have chosen to start their families in their late thirties and early forties.

In 2005, ten times as many women had their first child between the ages of 35 and 39 as in 1975, and thirteen times as many had their first between 40 and 44.

Women now have the option to define for themselves when they're ready for a family, rather than sticking to a schedule set by social convention.

As a society, however, we have yet to come to terms with the phenomenon of later motherhood, and women who decide it makes sense for them to delay pregnancy often find themselves confronted with alarmist warnings about the dangers of waiting too long.

In Ready, Elizabeth Gregory tracks the burgeoning trend of new later motherhood and demonstrates for many women today, waiting for family works best.

She provides compelling evidence of the benefits of having children later -- by birth or by adoption.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 336 pages
Click to order/for more info: Ready

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Ready on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Mom and gram, by marya | emdot, on Flickr
Photo credit: Mom and gram, by Marya/Emdot
What is FSH?

Here is an oversimplified and unscientific definition of FSH: FSH stands for the follicle-stimulating hormone.

It is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland which, in the female, stimulates the ovaries to develop a follicle – the housing surrounding the egg prior to ovulation – each month.

It can be thought of metaphorically as the gas pedal which causes the ovaries to ovulate each month.

As women age, it becomes more difficult for the ovaries to ovulate, so the level of FSH rises (in order to push down the gas pedal further) over time.

When a woman enters menopause, her ovaries are depleted and the gas pedal stays depressed permanently; that is to say, the FSH level remains high.

If you've ever been told you have High FSH, Bad Eggs, or Diminished/Poor Ovarian Reserve, then you will want to read this: High FSH and Infertility

Includes an overview of meds used in ART, high FSH-friendly REs and research articles on high FSH.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Pregnant, by Robert A. Greene M.D. and Laurie Tarkan. Publisher: Three Rivers Press (April 29, 2008)Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Pregnant
by Robert A. Greene M.D. and Laurie Tarkan

-- You have more than one hundred hormones circulating in your body – reproductive hormones, pregnancy hormones, sex hormones, metabolic hormones, and stress hormones – relaying messages from tissue to tissue, organ to organ, brain to body, and body to brain.

An equilibrium, a perfect balance in both partners, often determines your ability to conceive and support a pregnancy.

When your body is imbalanced, conception becomes very difficult. Luckily, hormonal imbalances can be corrected.

Drawing on the latest research in this field – which links underlying hormonal issues with infertility in men and women – Dr. Robert Greene, fertility specialist, OB/GYN, and reproductive endocrinologist, has created the Perfect Balance Fertility Program to help patients attain the optimal hormonal health necessary for conception.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 352 pages
Click to order/for more info: Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Healthy Fruit, by Julita Bodensee/Schweiz on Pixabay
Being overweight, or obese for example, reduces both male and female fertility.

In women, it can affect ovulation.

Being underweight can also impact on fertility, particularly for women, who will not ovulate if they are severely underweight.

Smoking not only affects a person's general and long-term health, but it can also affect fertility and stress can reduce sexual desire, reducing the frequency of sexual intercourse.

Severe stress may also affect female ovulation and can limit sperm production.

Nutrition – what people are eating – also has an impact on fertility.

Many of us will be aware of the importance of folic acid for women trying to conceive, or that zinc is good for healthy sperm, but the role of nutrition infertility goes beyond this.

Read more: Healthy eating can help perk up fertility


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Yes, You Can Get Pregnant: The Diet That Will Improve Your Fertility Now and Into Your 40's, by Aimee E. Raupp. Publisher: Demos Health; 1 edition (May 22, 2014)Yes, You Can Get Pregnant: The Diet That Will Improve Your Fertility Now and Into Your 40's
by Aimee E. Raupp

-- Worried about your ability to have children in the next five years?

Have you been trying to get pregnant for a while now and it's just not happening?

Does it seem like every woman you know is having a hard time getting pregnant and you don't want that to be you when you're ready?

If you answered yes to any one of these questions, Aimee's second book, Yes, You Can Get Pregnant: The Diet That Will Improve Your Fertility Now and Into Your 40s, was written for you.

Whether you're in your 20s, 30s or 40s, this book will give you all the nutritional information you need to keep your baby-making machinery in tip-top shape.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 52 pages
Click to order/for more info: Yes, You Can Get Pregnant



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