Amazon.com lists over 11,000 items under the search term "fertility"
Image: Cold Clock, by Marcelo Gerpe on FreeImage
Photo Credit: by Cold Clock, by Marcelo Gerpe
AMH [Anti-Mullerian Hormone test] assessment is also useful in fertility assessment as it provides a guide to ovarian reserve, and identifies women who may need to consider either egg freezing or trying for a pregnancy sooner rather than later if their long-term future fertility is poor.

Measuring AMH alone may be misleading as high levels occur in conditions like polycystic ovarian syndrome, and therefore AMH levels should be considered in conjunction with a transvaginal scan of the ovaries to assess antral follicle count.

In view of it's potential use to assess a woman's ovarian reserve and future fertility, measurement of AMH is sometimes called the biological Body Clock Test.

It also has the potential to rationalize the program of ovulation induction and decisions about the number of embryos to transfer in assisted reproduction techniques to maximize pregnancy success rates whilst minimizing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)

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TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health, by Toni Weschler. Publisher: Collins; 10th anniversary edition (October 31, 2006)Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition:
The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health
by Toni Weschler

-- For any woman unhappy with her current method of birth control; demoralized by her quest to have a baby; or experiencing confusing symptoms in her cycle, this book provides answers to all these questions, plus amazing insights into a woman's body.

Weschler thoroughly explains the empowering Fertility Awareness Method, which in only a couple minutes a day allows a woman to:
• Enjoy highly effective, scientifically proven birth control without chemicals or devices
• Maximize her chances of conception or expedite fertility treatment by identifying impediments to conception
• Increase the likelihood of choosing the gender of her baby
• Gain control of her sexual and gynecological health

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 512 pages
Click to order/for more info: Taking Charge of Your Fertility





Image: Newborn baby, by Joelle Inge-Messerschmidt/www.photographybyjoelle.com, on Flickr
Newborn baby, by Joelle Inge-Messerschmidt/Photographybyjoelle.com
In the 'Infertility Support' forum on TCOYF's [Taking Care of Your Fertility] website, a link to a free PDF manuscript of a very interesting book was posted:

Fertile-vs-Infertile-Book: How infections affect your fertility and your baby’s health, by Attila Toth, M.D.

Dr. Toth wrote: "If you are in the midst trying to have a family, the book will help you navigate through reproduction with the optimal possible outcome. If all that is behind you, in reading these pages you will understand why things worked out the way they did—why you never had children or if you had them, why they turned out the way they did."

This book discusses how untreated bacterial infections are often the cause of unexplained infertility, as well as miscarriages, still births, sick babies and even cancer and heart disease.

The post containing this link was in response to a woman who mentioned that her unexplained infertility was caused by a bacterial infection that was diagnosed in her husband's second semen analysis.

Their first doctor only tested for the usual stuff -- volume, motility, morphology.

The second doctor also tested for pathogens and found a raging infection that had no symptoms.

This couple conceived immediately after their first round of antibiotics.

They wasted over a year because the first doctor did not test them for bacterial infections.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health, by Toni Weschler. Publisher: Collins; 10th anniversary edition (October 31, 2006)Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition:
The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health
by Toni Weschler

-- For any woman unhappy with her current method of birth control; demoralized by her quest to have a baby; or experiencing confusing symptoms in her cycle, this book provides answers to all these questions, plus amazing insights into a woman's body.

Weschler thoroughly explains the empowering Fertility Awareness Method, which in only a couple minutes a day allows a woman to:
• Enjoy highly effective, scientifically proven birth control without chemicals or devices
• Maximize her chances of conception or expedite fertility treatment by identifying impediments to conception
• Increase the likelihood of choosing the gender of her baby
• Gain control of her sexual and gynecological health

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 512 pages
Click to order/for more info: Taking Charge of Your Fertility



Image: Vicky Stikeman, 50, with daughters Clara, 8, and Coco 2
Photo credit: Pawael Dwulitt/Toronto Star
Like any excited and caring mom, Vicky Stikeman is engaged, playful and active with her two young girls.

Unlike most, she has already celebrated her 50th birthday.

Sometimes people think I'm crazy – sometimes I still think I'm crazy, Stikeman says with a chuckle.

A single, career-oriented woman since her 20s, Stikeman got on the fast-track to family life when she met her husband at 40, married at 41 then had her wedding night baby, Clara.

Read the rest of the article


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Belated Baby: A Guide to Parenting After Infertility, by Kelly James-Enger and Jill S. Browning. Publisher: Cumberland House Publishing (May 1, 2008)The Belated Baby: A Guide to Parenting After Infertility
by Kelly James-Enger and Jill S. Browning

-- Infertility is a mind-set and that every woman who experiences infertility is forever changed, even when she eventually has the child she yearned for.

When many women who have gone through fertility treatments describe their experience, they say it abused their soul.

The experience may have also hurt their relationship with their husband and sometimes permanently altered relationships with their extended families.

Studies show that even after the desperation of infertility subsides, emotional wounds still fester and an asterisk accompanies her bundle of joy.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 242 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Belated Baby



Image: Bah Chor Mee to increase FertilitySINGAPORE – For men and women who have learned through FSH testing that they may have fertility issues, simply eating Bah Chor Mee could help increase their chances of conceiving.

A new study has shown that the increase in unrefined Vitamin F levels, that can only be found in cooked Bah Chor or minced pork bits, is closely linked to fertility in men and women.

Soh Boon Leng, a Bah Chor Mee Seller, has been preaching the magical properties of Bah Chor Mee for a long time.

I have always knew that eating Bah Chor Mee can help people give birth to more babies, many old midwives have used this strategy to great success.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
The New Fertility Diet Guide: Delicious Food Secrets To Help You Get Pregnant Faster At Any Age, by Niels H. Lauersen and Colette Bouchez. Publisher: Ivy League Press (September 21, 2009)
The New Fertility Diet Guide: Delicious Food Secrets To Help You Get Pregnant Faster At Any Age
by Niels H. Lauersen and Colette Bouchez

-- The best selling authors of Getting Pregnant: What You Need To Know Now share new secrets to using specific foods and food combinations to greatly enhance your chance of getting pregnant fast and easy.

Tested on hundreds of couples, this unique new natural way to increase fertility can work regardless of your age or reproductive status. Studies show it can even increase your IVF success rate!

Delicious, nutritious and easy to follow, this secret food plan works for both women and men to not only help increase fertility, but also improve overall health and encourage conception of a healthier baby!

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 184 pages
Click to order/for more info: The New Fertility Diet Guide

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading The New Fertility Diet Guide on your Kindle in under a minute!

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Image: Newborn Baby, by Anita Peppers, on MorgueFile
Photo credit: Newborn Baby, by Anita Peppers
Women who have high levels of vitamin E in their blood during pregnancy tend to give birth to heavier babies, a new study suggests.

The conclusions suggest that vitamin E may have a more significant impact on fetal growth than was previously believed.

During the study, over 1,200 pregnant women were monitored for their vitamin E levels during their 28th week of pregnancy.

What they found was that among the women with highest levels of vitamin E, the birth weight of their babies was highest.

They also found these women were three times less likely to have low birth weight babies than those with the lowest concentration of vitamin E.

However, the scientists did say it was not clear that the vitamin E levels were not a marker of other factors that promote fetal development, such as a healthy diet.

They also said they are as yet not recommending pregnant women take any additional vitamin E than that which is contained in prenatal vitamins.

In fact, they say excessive levels of vitamin E have actually been linked to pregnancy complications, such as low birth weight babies.

Source: IOL.co.za


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Fertility and Conception: A Complete Guide to Getting Pregnant, by Zita West. Publisher: DK ADULT; 1st edition (December 15, 2003)Fertility and Conception: A Complete Guide to Getting Pregnant
by Zita West

-- Aimed at couples that are planning to start a family, from those who have already experienced problems conceiving to those who have only recently decided to have a baby, Fertility and Conception is loaded with advice and up-to-date information on maximizing fertility.

Bridging the gap between conventional and complimentary treatments, the book offers a unique approach to fertility by offering Plan A, a 4-week preconception program of diet and complimentary therapies, and Plan B, which focuses on combining conventional treatments such as IVF, with complimentary treatments.

In clear, easy-to-understand prose, the author provides cutting-edge information on all the latest fertility tests and treatments, and offers advice on how to achieve healthy ovulation through diet, correct hormone balance, and reducing the effects of disorders that derail fertility.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: Fertility and Conception



Image: Worry or relief - Photo Credit: Supreet Vaid on FreeImages
Photo Credit: Worry or relief, by Supreet Vaid
Low estrogen can give you constant headaches, little to no EWCM [egg-white cervical mucus] and long delayed ovulation and may prevent you from hanging onto a pregnancy.

The only time I don't have a headaches lately is as ovulation approaches and during the early part of my Luteal Phase (LP), before my estrogen starts to fall. During some natural monitor cycling, I had bloodwork that showed me when my estrogen was too low.

So I started a campaign to get my estrogen back up. I used Soy Isoflavones 200mg/day from day 3-10. I got some estrogen cream from my hormone doctor, 5mg Biest, and I use it every single day. This cycle, up till ovulation, I used it once/day, but once I got a +OPK, I started using it 2x/day.

I also have been drinking pomegranate juice, eating oatmeal, carrots, green beans, peas, beets, potatoes, rice and rye bread. Pre-ovulation, I took Garlic (500mg) and Evening Primrose Oil (EPO) (1,000mg). All these seemed to help to increase your estrogen.

The previous two cycles, it took me till day 29 to ovulate. But starting this campaign last cycle, I had no headaches during my LP, and my estrogen stayed over 125 as of 7 days past ovulation (dpo).

Now this cycle, I ovulated on day 19, I had plenty of EWCM (egg-white cervical mucus), and so far the headaches are better. So I know it's helping, though it may need to be tweaked more.

Other foods that raise estrogen are alfalfa, anise, apples, barley, cherries, clover, fennel, hops, licorice, parsley, red beans, sage, sesame seeds, soybeans, sprouts, wheat and yeast. Herbs are: Black Cohosh, Blessed Thistle, Red Clover, Boron and Ginseng.

What I don't know is, if some foods work better than others? I haven't been able to find any sort of break-down, just a list of foods and herbs. So I just eat what foods I like, and hope for the best!

BTW, if you are taking Vitex or False Unicorn Root, they lower estrogen.

But I hope that give you some ideas.

Now, of course, the problem with estrogen and headaches is that they can be caused by low estrogen, high estrogen or even surges of estrogen. It really depends on how your hormones affect you.

This is why some women get a migraine at ovulation, from the surge of estrogen. There is also a second surge around implantation.

You really can't know for sure without blood work, and I recommend it highly before starting to play around with herbs, etc. If your estrogen is already high, it can make your problems much worse if you work to increase it, thinking it is low...

In fact, most women have too high of estrogen at this point. It will all depend on how you process your hormones, what's normal for you. Some women sail thru peri-menopause without a problem, and some suffer terribly. Most are somewhere in between. As everything else, it's just the luck of the draw!

From the article Is Too Low of Estrogen a Problem? :
Symptoms of Low Estrogen – Hot flashes, Shortness of breath, Night sweats, Sleep disorders, insomnia, Vaginal dryness, Dry hair/skin, Hair loss, Anxiety, Mood swings, Headaches, Depression, Short term memory loss, Frequent urinary tract infections, Heart palpitations, Frequent yeast infections, Vaginal shrinking, Loss of pubic hair, Painful intercourse, Inability to reach orgasm


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Garden of Fertility: A Guide to Charting Your Fertility Signals to Prevent or Achieve Pregnancy--Naturally--and to Gauge Your Reproductive Health, by Katie Singer. Publisher: Avery Trade (April 22, 2004)The Garden of Fertility: A Guide to Charting Your Fertility Signals to Prevent or Achieve Pregnancy--Naturally--and to Gauge Your Reproductive Health
by Katie Singer

-- A guide to using fertility awareness - that is, reading fertility signals in order to prevent or achieve pregnancy.

Certified fertility educator Katie Singer explains how to observe and chart fertility cycles to determine when a woman is most fertile to increase chances of conception, or to exercise birth control naturally - a method that, when followed precisely, is as effective as the Pill.

Unlike other books on fertility awareness, The Garden of Fertility also describes how to use the charts to gauge gynecological health and offers non-medical options for strengthening reproductive wellness.

This book provides all the information women never learned in sex education class, but should have.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 320 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Garden of Fertility



Image: Thyroid and FertilityThyroid issues can be blatantly obvious or invisible.

Either way, thyroid problems can be a factor in fertility issues for women trying to get pregnant.

Many women who are having trouble conceiving may not know that a thyroid problem is at the root of their fertility issues.

Dr. Susan L. Treiser, a reproductive endocrinologist, co-founder and co-director of IVF New Jersey, an Attain Fertility® Center, sees this situation often and offers information and advice to women.

There are two basic thyroid categories, Hyperthyroid and Hypothyroid.

Women who are having difficulty getting pregnant and recognize any of the symptoms should see a specialist right away.

Hyperthyroid symptoms include:
  • Weight loss, trouble maintaining weight
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Mood swings, feeling nervous and irritable.
  • Rapid and irregular heartbeat
  • Feeling hot
Hypothyroid symptoms include:
  • Trouble losing weight; easy weight gain
  • Feeling sluggish and depressed
  • Constipation
  • Aching joints and muscles
  • Feeling cold
In addition, one of the most common symptoms of both Hyperthyroid and Hypothyroid is an irregular menstrual cycle which can be an indicator of infertility.

Dr. Treiser suggests that even if women don’t have any of the symptoms, a simple thyroid test performed by an endocrinologist will help rule out possible causes of infertility.

The test will determine whether too much or not enough Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is being produced. TSH triggers the thyroid to produce two different hormones, T3 and T4.

When the thyroid produces too much (hyperthyroid) or too little (hypothyroid) of these hormones thyroid problems can occur, including fertility problems.

One culprit in cases of hyperthyroidism that can lead to infertility and other health issues is having too much iodine in your diet.  

The thyroid gland needs a certain amount of dietary iodine to keep it healthy, explains Dr. Treiser. Found in regular table salt and other food sources, too much iodine can lead to a hyperthyroid. Conversely, on rare occasions, low iodine in a diet can lead to a hypothyroid.

Whether hyper- or hypothyroid, under the care of a fertility specialist, women have very good chances of becoming pregnant.

There are risks and being monitored by a specialist throughout the pregnancy is extremely important, said Dr. Treiser. Women who are hyperthyroid may run the risk of having a low birth-weight baby or have problems with pre-term labor.

Those with a hypothyroid may have a higher risk of miscarrying. The bottom line is that women with any type of thyroid issue need to work with a fertility specialist and be monitored regularly to ensure a healthy pregnancy.

About IntegraMed America, Inc.
IntegraMed is a leader in developing, marketing and managing specialty outpatient healthcare facilities, with a current focus on the fertility and vein care markets. IntegraMed supports its provider networks with clinical and business information systems, marketing and sales, facilities and operations management, finance and accounting, human resources, legal, risk management, quality assurance, and fertility treatment financing programs.

Attain Fertility® Centers, (attainfertility.com ) an IntegraMed Specialty, offers the nation's largest fertility center network, with 14 company-managed partner centers and 24 affiliate centers, comprising over 130 locations across 32 states and the District of Columbia. Nearly one of every four IVF procedures in the U.S. is performed in an Attain Fertility Centers network practice.

Source


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Right Time Baby: The Complete Guide to Later Motherhood and Pregnancy, by Claudia Spahr. Publisher: Hay House (May 1, 2011)Right Time Baby: The Complete Guide to Later Motherhood and Pregnancy
by Claudia Spahr

-- There couldn't be a better time for motherhood than after you've explored some of your own dreams and ambitions.

Studies show later mothers to be more secure emotionally and financially than younger mothers and nearly a quarter of all women in the UK are now having babies after 35.

Packed full of useful tips from top medical experts, scientists and world authorities, including Dr Michel Odent and Dr Marilyn Glenville, this book is a complete guide for the woman who's lived a life before giving birth.

It covers: preparing for pregnancy and motherhood; how to improve egg quality and prolong fertility so you can get pregnant naturally; exercises, relaxation techniques, mind-body connection for conception; how to increase your chances of success at IVF; making the most of your pregnancy, month by month; ways to avoid pregnancy loss; pregnancy yoga and natural remedies for common pregnancy ailments; how to have the best birth possible; from me to mum - adjusting to lack of sleep, relationship changes and that other job; parenting secrets and concepts from around the globe to inspire new mothers; and, the latest research in neuroscience, nutrition and psychology.

Get ready to embrace the biggest, most exciting transition of your life!

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 320 pages
Click to order/for more info: Right Time Baby

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Right Time Baby on your Kindle in under a minute!

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Image: Nature's Way Vitex or Wild Yam
Herbs like Wild Yam and Vitex have been found to encourage ovulation, but only if you have the imbalance known as kidney yang vacuity (which includes luteal phase defect and low progesterone levels,) according to the pattern differentiation of Chinese medicine.

If you are deficient in yin energies (like estrogen), taking wild yam and/or vitex will make your scenario worse.

Yin deficiency symptoms include hot flashes, night sweats, dry eyes, mouth, vagina, lack of cervical mucus, etc.

Herbs like angelica and asparagi would be appropriate here to restore reproductive balance.

Yang deficiency symptoms include low back pain, cold hands and feet, nighttime urination, low libido, etc.

Herbs like Vitex and wild yam will help this scenario restore endocrine health.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Murphy Lives Here, by Dr. Merryl J. Polak. Publisher: Merryl Polak (July 23, 2012)Murphy Lives Here
by Dr. Merryl J. Polak

-- Initially apprehensive about becoming a mother, Emma mapped out her life plans steered by fulfillment of a happy marriage and career.

She thought she might one day feel ready and willing to add the role of mother to her life's responsibilities, but she had not quite figured out when that would occur.

When Emma's biological clock smacked her upside the head and she suddenly craved motherhood over every other aspect of life, she was stunned to discover that she could not get pregnant.

After a year of ovulation test kits and timed baby making under her belt, it was inevitable that other avenues needed exploration.

After pursuing every option, including adoption, Emma learned that becoming a parent was not as simple a process as she had always envisioned.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 226 pages
Click to order/for more info: Murphy Lives Here

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Murphy Lives Here on your Kindle in under a minute!

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Image: Sami and Mamita by Dee, on Morguefile
Photo credit: Sami and Mamita, by Dee
There's been a lot of talk in the news recently of older women undergoing IVF to have babies.

A 66-year-old woman had a baby in Romania after undergoing fertility treatments.

A woman in California, who was 63, lied about her age to undergo IVF [in vitro fertilization].

That makes many people wonder: How old is too old?

Should we stop an older woman from having a baby because the health risks are too high? Or should we allow anyone who can afford to do so to undergo IVF, regardless of her advanced age?

What do you think? Should there be an age cutoff for fertility treatments or should we allow anyone who wants to conceive a chance to do so?


Rights: People are concerned about an epidemic of older women having babies, but in actuality there were only 323 babies born to women over 50 in 2003, a 23-percent increase over the 263 births reported for 2002.

Since 1997, when donor egg became available, the number of births for women aged 50–54 years has increased with an average annual gain of 14 percent.

Source: Births: Final Data for 2003

Of the 323 babies born to women over 50, only a small percentage would be Donor Egg. The rest would be a surprise to the woman, who probably thought she was in menopause. Oops!

We must be careful when we consider taking away a woman's reproductive rights. Currently they are talking about age 27 being the cut-off age for getting pregnant without medical help.

Who will be considered too old by the time your children have children?

TAXES: In 2003, there were only 323 babies born to women over 50 in the US. A large number of them were oops! babies, not thru donor egg.

There have been only about six babies born to women over 60 since donor egg first became available. All were born to women wealthy enough to afford to pay for it - at $30,000 a cycle, and it took them several cycles to accomplish.

They have the resources to pay for nannies, night nurses, daycare, private school. They have made plans, have investments, created a will, chosen guardians in the event of their death. These were planned, very much wanted and anticipated babies.

How many children are born unplanned to teen moms, addicts, abuse? How many born into poverty, how many that end up in the system?

QUOTE: Poverty affects all ages, but an astonishing 48% percent of its victims are children:

* About 15 million children -- one out of every four -- live below the official poverty line.
* 22% of Americans under the age of 18 -- and 25% under age 12 -- are hungry or at the risk of being hungry.
* Everyday 2,660 children are born into poverty; 27 die because of it.
* Children and families are the fastest growing group in the homeless population, representing 40%.

Source: Children in Poverty: America's Ongoing War

Honestly, where do you really think your tax dollars are going? To raise the 6 babies that might be orphaned by older moms, who planned for their future? Or to take care of the thousands of babies born to young moms who abandon, die from AIDS, or have their children removed?

Face it, only the very wealthy can afford this option, and very few women in their 60s would have ANY interest in giving birth to a child at that point in their lives.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Motherhood After 35: Choices, Decisions, Options, by Maggie Jones. Publisher: Da Capo Press; 1 edition (March 22, 1998)Motherhood After 35: Choices, Decisions, Options
by Maggie Jones

-- How is having a baby different for women in their late thirties and early forties?

If you're between 35 and 45 and trying to have a baby, or have already conceived, here's the reassurance you need ... and the facts you've been waiting for.

Maggie Jones evaluates the advantages as well as the risks of later motherhood.

Whether you are considering your first pregnancy after 35 or are starting a second family later in life, Motherhood After 35 is written with you in mind.

The author describes simply and clearly how to have the healthiest pregnancy possible and the options available.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: Motherhood After 35



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