Amazon.com lists over 8,000 items under the search term "fertility"
Image: Food Photography, by Christine Sponchia on Pixabay
Research has shown up to a third of couples struggle to conceive - so what can people do to increase their fertility?

Nutritionist Yvonne Bishop-Weston gives her advice on the best foods to help to make you fertile.

1. Eat organic - We don't yet know what the impact may be of untested combinations of pesticides and food additives on fertility.

2. Go up-to-8-a-day - Five handfuls of veg and three pieces of fruit a day in a variety of colors such as red, purple, orange and dark green help to top up antioxidant levels which may help protect the genetic material in the egg and sperm.

3. Phytoestrogens for hormone balance - These plant-based hormone balancers help to prevent imbalances between estrogen and progesterone which may lead to fertility problems and early miscarriage.

4. Cut out the fertility hinderers - Two of the most important things to remove from your diet are alcohol and caffeine.

5. Get prepared - It's also a good idea to reduce the foods and drinks you can't eat during pregnancy before you fall pregnant so you are fully prepared and don't need to worry if you had something early on which is better avoided.

6. Essential fats - These fats support male and female fertility and hormonal balance and also help the baby's brain, nervous system and eyes to develop once pregnant.

7. Algae - Algae is a true super-food as it contains a vast array of nutrients, essential fats and amino acids in a totally natural and easy to absorb form.

Read more: Foods that make you fertile


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility, by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller. Publisher: Findhorn Press; Pap/DVD edition (October 7, 2011)
The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility
by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller

-- Women who are trying to conceive will find a holistic approach in this hands-on manual.

Step-by-step guidelines help implement a three-part program — of yoga, hypoallergenic and anti-inflammatory nutrition, and stress-reduction techniques — to cleanse the body, mind, and spirit in preparation for pregnancy.

In addition, this program draws on cleansing methods from traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and has been specifically designed for women who are trying naturally or with assisted-reproduction plans.

Also based on new clinical research that suggests that gut health, chronic inflammation, and environmental toxins may be root causes of infertility, this important book offers all women a natural, holistic approach to readying the womb for a child.

📚 Paperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Infertility Cleanse

📚 Start reading The Infertility Cleanse on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: At 40, Gina Bumgarner was pregnant with her twins sons Baylor, right, and Blaine, who is pictured playing with sister Addison, 14

In her early 40s, Deborah Walker still had hopes of becoming a mom.

Like many of her peers, she'd chosen to first focus on her career and then on children. The Hermitage, Tenn., woman had already suffered a pregnancy loss. But four days before moving from New York to Nashville to join her husband, she found herself pregnant.

At the age of 42, she gave birth to little Madeline.

You have a rich life tapestry to wrap around your child, says Walker, now 45. I love that I'm an older mom. I wasn't ready before; I wasn't the person I wanted to be to be a mother. I am now.

This is the age of the older mom. But fertility favors the young, raising the question of, biologically, how old is too old to have a baby.

When a woman reaches her late 30s and her 40s, the possibility of conceiving naturally -- or conceiving at all -- is a door slowly swinging shut.

Plus, there are higher risks of pregnancy loss and genetic issues that accompany pregnancy at an older age.

Beyond that, there are ramifications to consider, such as simultaneously funding college tuition and retirement. But many women feel there are inherent rewards in waiting those extra years.

Many women in their 40s have had a chance to figure out who they are, says Dr. Cornelia Graves, medical director of Baptist Hospital's perinatal and obstetrics program in Nashville.

That's really important because when you're in your 20s, sometimes you have children because it's the expected thing to do. Whereas women in their 40s, this is what they've elected to do. 

The risks of conceiving

Fertility drops off sharply in a woman's late 30s. But women can still conceive naturally up until around age 50, Graves says.

But biologically, the best time for having a baby is between the ages of 22 and 32, she says.

If you're trying to get pregnant in your late 30s or early 40s, the literature says you should try for a year before seeking help, Graves says. I say three to six months because your time is much more limited.

A woman's fertility is highest and the possibility of complications lower, earlier on. Women are born with a finite number of eggs. Not only do those eggs wane in number as a woman ages, but they've weathered more. When you're 40, your eggs are 40.

That's why the possibility of genetic irregularities such as Down syndrome, a chromosomal disorder, grows as a woman gets older.

Fertility starts to slide in a woman's 30s, says Dr. Gloria Richard-Davis, chairwoman of obstetrics and gynecology at Meharry Medical College in Nashville. By age 40, the decline becomes even more drastic.

For all those reasons, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine encourages women to have all their kids by age 37, she says.

Obviously, that's not realistic for many women and the type of lifestyle we have now, Richard-Davis adds. Women are getting married later and having children later. It doesn't mean if you're over 40, you can't get pregnant, but the probability dramatically declines.
However, Hollywood has provided some recent examples of older moms.

Oscar-winning actress Halle Berry had her daughter in March at age 41. Nicole Kidman, who's 40 and married to country music singer Keith Urban, is expecting her first biological child in July. (Kidman has two adopted children with former husband Tom Cruise.)

Why women wait

Age-related infertility is increasingly more common. One in five women wait until they're older than 35 to start their families, reports the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

ASRM attributes the trend to several factors: the availability of contraception and the high divorce rate, coupled with more women in the workforce, women marrying at an older age and married couples waiting to be financially secure before starting their families.

Add to this mix that many women simply just don't realize fertility begins to wane in their late 20s.

Then there are the added complications of raising a child at a later age.

Vikki Adkins of Mt. Juliet, Tenn., got married at age 33. She had her first child when she was 39 and her second at 41. Adkins considers herself a high-energy person, but keeping up with a 6-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy can still be tough.

She worries about the future, funding her children's college educations and her own retirement. Not to mention adolescence and menopause will probably make concurrent appearances.

I am 48 now and lucky I have my children, Adkins says, but I think it is harder than when you are in your 20s and early 30s.

Not that there aren't advantages, too, to have children later in life. Many moms feel their age is an asset, giving them patience they lacked before. Medical professionals also notice the difference.

I think you've kind of learned to roll with the punches of life, so you don't fixate on every little thing, says Baptist's Graves.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Way of the Fertile Soul: Ten Ancient Chinese Secrets to Tap into a Woman's Creative Potential, by Randine Lewis. Publisher: Atria Books/Beyond Words; Original edition (November 6, 2007)
The Way of the Fertile Soul:
Ten Ancient Chinese Secrets to Tap into a Woman's Creative Potential

by Randine Lewis

Being fertile and fruitful can mean giving birth to a child -- but to have a fertile soul means to give birth to the true self a woman wants to be: to live a life filled with passion, strength, joy, and adventure.

In The Way of the Fertile Soul, Dr. Randine Lewis outlines ten ancient Chinese medical and Taoist secrets that hold the little-known key to successfully conceiving babies, new dreams, and fulfilling life for women at any phase in their lives.

The Way of the Fertile Soul encourages women to strive toward health, abundance, and a fruitful, joyous approach to life.

By using diagnostic questionnaires, qigong exercises, and guided meditations to help the reader understand how the elements of nature express themselves in her body, mind, and spirit, The Way of the Fertile Soul provides the tools to greatly increase a woman's chance of conceiving, identify imbalances, reduce stress, increase energy, and uncover her intrinsic creativity and express it fully.

📚 Paperback: 240 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Way of the Fertile Soul

📚 Start reading The Way of the Fertile Soul on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: woman pregnant belly baby outdoors pregnancy, by Lisa Runnels on Pixabay

Found on the Soulcysters message board:

My doctor has me taking 200 mg of soy cycle day 1-5 and then 150mg of Clomid cycle day 5-9.

I am taking the soy in the morning and the Clomid in the evening, so that on cycle day 5 I will take 200 mg of soy in the morning and 150mg of Clomid in the evening. I am to start OPK's [ovulation prediction kit] on cycle day 12 at 10am.

When I get a positive, I will go in for an ultrasound to check my lining and my follies, and then I will do an IUI [intra-uterine insemination] at 12 PM the following day, take another OPK [ovulation prediction kit] that day before the IUI, and if it is positive still, then I will get one more IUI done the 24 hours after the first one.

My doctor actually explained it well by saying that the photoestrogens in the soy will be estrogenic and cause my lining to thicken to counteract the Clomid's thinning, it will also give my eggs an estrogenic boost to ripening, so that I will ovulate sooner.

He also said that if we weren't doing an IUI cycle, the soy would be helpful in making a lot of good quality EWCM [egg white cervical mucus].

My doctor did do a small study with 200 women on 100 mg of Clomid - 100 with soy and 100 without. All of the women had to have proven ovulation with Clomid.

Here were his results:

In the women taking Clomid without/with soy:

• average uterine lining thickness : 7.5mm/11.3mm
• average number of mature (20mm or larger) follicles: 2.5/3.5
• average number of released follicles: 2/3
• percent of women that ovulated (verified by ultrasound and progesterone blood testing): 87%/93%
• average day of ovulation: 18/15
• average level of serum progesterone 10 days after ovulation: 9.3/12.2
• percent of ovulating women becoming pregnant with IUI over a course of three cycles (blood hcg levels greater than 5): 43.6%/68.7%
• percent of women that became pregnant that went on to give birth: 52.3%/89.7%

CONTRAINDICATIONS and PRECAUTIONS

Soy isoflavones are contraindicated in those who are hypersensitive to any component of a soy isoflavone-containing product.

Pregnant women and nursing mothers should avoid the use of soy isoflavone supplements pending long-term safety studies. Men with prostate cancer should discuss the advisability of the use of soy isoflavones with their physicians before deciding to use them.

Women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors should exercise caution in the use of soy isoflavones and should only use them if they are recommended and monitored by a physician.

Soy isoflavone intake has been associated with hypothyroidism in some.

NOTE: This post has been created for informational purposes only. This post is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Zita West's Guide to Fertility and Assisted Conception: Essential Advice on Preparing Your Body for IVF and Other Fertility Treatments, by Zita West. Publisher: Random House UK (April 12, 2010)
Zita West's Guide to Fertility and Assisted Conception: Essential Advice on Preparing Your Body for IVF and Other Fertility Treatments
by Zita West

-- Embarking on IVF — or any assisted fertility treatment—can be a very demanding and stressful experience, but the right physical, nutritional, and emotional support can lessen these stresses and strains and increase the chances of success.

Here a leading fertility and pregnancy expert offers an in-depth explanation of all aspects of fertility and, uniquely, addresses the issues involved in using assisted conception.

She explains fertility from preconception and trying naturally to assisted conception, what is involved in the IVF process, how to prepare your body to increase the chances of conceiving successfully, the importance of a proactive approach to diet and nutrition, and how complementary therapies, such as acupuncture, can increase the chances of success.

Including interviews with leading experts in the field, case histories from patients, and the author's own holistic principles, this is an invaluable guide for the growing number of people who are considering, or have already embarked on, medical intervention to enable them to conceive.

📚 Start reading Zita West's Guide to Fertility and Assisted Conception on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: Baby Covered in a White Blanket, Photo by Luma Pimentel on Unsplash

Image: Lymph Node Sign
The Lymph Node Sign is helpful in about 75% of cases.

Around ovulation a lymph gland in the groin on the same side as the ovulating ovary enlarges to about the size of a pea and becomes tender when pressed.

Daily examination of this gland will reveal the increase in size and tenderness.

This is best done lying down with fingers straight, and pointing to the leg, so that the middle finger can feel the pulsating artery to the leg.

The index finger will then be over the lymph gland.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Zita West's Guide to Getting Pregnant: The Complete Programme from the Renowned Fertility Expert | Kindle Edition | Print length: 404 pages |  by Zita West (Author). Publisher: Harper Thorsons; UK ed. edition (June 28, 2012)
Zita West's Guide to Getting Pregnant
by Zita West

-- A pioneer in the field of fertility, Zita West's programme is invaluable for couples trying to conceive.

Harley Street's most popular fertility expert, and favourite consultant to celebrity clients, guides the reader through a process of vital physical and mental preparation.

The book is for every couple trying to conceive and has fascinating advice taken from Zita's 20 years of experience as midwife and 7 years as an acupuncturist.

It provides a structured, easy-to-follow step-by-step programme, complete with case studies and and enormously detailed questionnaire.

The guide includes details on:
• when and how often to have sex
• what can prevent fertilization and conception
• everything you need to know about sperm and ovulation
• nutrition, supplements and herbs
• complementary therapies such as acupressure, lymphatic massage and hypnotherapy
• how to overcome stress and other emotional blocks to pregnancy
• PCOS, endometriosis and other health issues
• tests and procedures if there is a problem
• and much much more.

📚 Start reading Zita West's Guide to Getting Pregnant on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: Ultrasound -  Photo Credit: jess lis on freeimages.com

More and more people are delaying parenthood until they are in their forties or even older.

Women over 35 getting pregnant, are the fastest-growing demographic in our modern world.

With the increased prevalence of older parents, it seems there is also increased controversy, discussion and resources swirling around the “older parents” movement.

There is a bevy of information online for older parents - whether you are considering adoption or pregnancy and birth, are interested in how children of older parents do in comparison to those whose parents are younger, or just want to gather information.

A couple of the best resources listed is my Stories of Pregnancy blogs!

🤰🏻 Stories of Pregnancy and Birth Over 44 is a fun site with a collection of thousands of stories and articles about and by older mothers. This resource focuses on women who give birth to biological children after the mid-forties, not necessarily parents who have adopted.

🤰🏻 Pregnancy Stories By Age -- My goal is to simply share stories I find online, for inspiration - to those trying - and comfort to those who find themselves unexpectedly pregnant!... Sort of a chicken soup for the TTCing over 44 soul!

More resources:

🤰🏻 While this site is in the United Kingdom, Mothers Over 40 is a positive and encouraging site with articles, resources and links relating to over forty parenting.

🤰🏻 Hot Flashes, Warm Bottles is a book written by Nancy London, M.S.W. is a great, about-time book for moms who are older.

Adopting.org has a wealth of information for adoptive parents over the age of forty online. This site provides stories, articles and links to other resources for older parents.

🤰🏻 For a positive spin, the article What are the Advantages of Having Children Later in Life written by Jan Anderson. This article has a nice, first-hand approach and lots of encouragement and personal experience information.

🤰🏻 You Can Get Pregnant Over 40 says, If you are over 40 and trying to conceive without success, or if you continually miscarry, you start to believe a successful pregnancy over 40 is impossible. I'm here to tell you that it was possible for me - naturally.

🤰🏻 Fertility Over 40 -- With over 12 years experience supporting women just like you. We know what works and what doesn't. Plus we give you the support and expertise of your own fertility coach! Join the thousands of other women who have achieved pregnancy over 40! Free membership to receive updates and free fertility tips.

🤰🏻 Age and Fertility (free booklet)


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: How to Make Love to a Plastic Cup: A Guy's Guide to the World of Infertility, by Greg Wolfe. Publisher: Harper Paperbacks; 1 edition (August 10, 2010)
How to Make Love to a Plastic Cup: A Guy's Guide to the World of Infertility
by Greg Wolfe

-- The man's guide to anything and everything in the infertility universe.

Greg Wolfe went through four cycles of IVF on his rocky journey to fatherhood—and now, with profound sympathy and side-splitting humor, he lays it all out for guys on similar baby-making quests.

How to Make Love to a Plastic Cup is not your typical nuts and bolts (no pun intended) medical guide but a helpful handbook designed specifically with the male partner in mind, with answers to his most pressing questions about the infertility process...

📚 Paperback: 256 pages
Click to order/for more info: How to Make Love to a Plastic Cup

📚 Start reading How to Make Love to a Plastic Cup on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: Happiness - child with woman. Photo credit: Paolo Milanesi on FreeImages

Natural menopause occurs:
• in 25% of women by age 47
• in 50% by age 50,
• 75% by age 52
• 95% by age 55.


Women can suddenly stop as early as 27 and as late as 59.

Birth Control ALERT!
If you are going through menopause and haven't had your period for a few months, you may think you can forego birth control.

DON'T! You can still become pregnant until a year after your last menstrual flow. In fact, your fertility may actually increase as your reproductive years come to an end.

And if you have been relying on the rhythm method (not having sex at certain times in the menstrual cycle), you should be especially careful during menopause because cycles become irregular.

ABSTRACT
Differences in the age at natural menopause were examined using a retrospective population sample of 289 naturally menopausal women.
The mean age at natural menopause was 46.70 ± 5.44 years.
Earlier menopause occurred in women living in semi-urban areas, divorced/separated and less educated women, and women who were younger at: first marriage, widowhood, divorce/separation and first or last full-term pregnancy.

Later menopause occurred in women who had: irregular menstrual periods before 25 years, dysmenorrhoea and mid-cycle spotting.
Duration of oral contraceptives use, weight and body mass index were significantly positively correlated with age at natural menopause.
Multiple regression analyses indicated that age at last full-term pregnancy, residence, pattern of menstrual cessation and duration of oral contraceptive use were the significant predictors of the end of menstrual activity.

There is considerable uncertainty as to what factors affect the timing of menopause.
Genetic and racial factors have recently been proposed to be the most important determinants of age at natural menopause.
In addition to genetic factors, several behavioural (smoking, nutrition, and socio-demographic factors), reproductive and anthropometric factors are also associated with age at menopause

Read more: Correlates of age at natural menopause: a community-based study in Alexandria


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Fully Fertile: A Holistic 12-Week Plan for Optimal Fertility | Paperback – Illustrated: 280 pages | by Tami Quinn (Author), Jeanie Lee Bussell (Author), Beth Heller (Author), Brian Kaplan (Foreword). Publisher: Findhorn Press; 2nd Edition, Expanded (October 1, 2010)
Fully Fertile: A 12-Week Holistic Plan for Optimal Fertility
by Tami Quinn, Jeanie Lee Bussell, Beth Heller

-- The healing powers of traditional yoga, Oriental medicine, nutrition, and other mind/body techniques are accessible with this do-it-yourself manual for women who are struggling with infertility or just looking to improve their odds of conception.

Natural methods based on Integrative Care for Fertility™ use a holistic approach to demonstrate how a home-based holistic fertility program can improve mind, body, and spirit, and in turn maximize chances for conceiving.

Photographs are provided to illustrate the proper yoga postures, and interspersed stories from yoga practitioners and experts present real-life struggles of infertility patients and victories that will inspire all women who are trying for a healthy pregnancy and birth.

📚 Paperback: 280 pages
Click to order/for more info: Fully Fertile

📚 Start reading Fully Fertile on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: David in his hospital bassinet, by Jessica Merz on Flickr
It's time to update this quote:

"In 2009, there were 105,827 live births in the United States to women ages 40 through 44 -- 7,320 live births to women 45 to 49 -- 569 live births to women 50-54.
In 2009, there were only 783 live births to women over 43, using donor eggs.""

Checking the 2018 birth stats today at the CDC and I found:

Age of mother

Women in their 40s -- The birth rate for women aged 40–44 was 11.8 births per 1,000 women in 2018, up 2% from 2017; the rate for this group has risen almost continuously since 1985. The number of births to women in their early 40s rose 2% from 2017 to 2018.

Women aged 45-49 -- The birth rate for women aged 45–49 (which includes births to women aged 50 and over) was 0.9 births per 1,000 women in 2018, unchanged from 2017. The number of births to women aged 45 and over was also unchanged from 2017 to 2018.

Women aged 50 and over -- There were 959 births to women aged 50 and over in 2018, up from 840 in 2017. The number of births to women in this age group has generally increased since 1997 (from 144 births), when data for women aged 50 and over became available again. The birth rate for women aged 50–54 rose to 0.9 births per 10,000 women in 2018, from 0.8 in 2017.

TOTAL (40-54) : 126,956 live births

NOTE: In this report, tables labeled 45-49 years, 45-54 years, and 50-54 years include births to mothers up to age 64.

Next I went to SART, who has the 2017 IVF and Donor Egg rates in the US:

Fresh Embryos From Non-Donor Oocytes
Number of cycles : (41-42) 12,258 (over 42) 8,652

Percentage of cycles resulting in live births : (41-42) 12.8 (over 42) 4.4

Total live births : (41-42) 1,569 (over 42) 381

TOTAL (over 40) : 1,950

Donor Oocytes (all ages)

Number of transfers : (Fresh Donor Eggs) 3,146 (Frozen Donor Eggs) 3,013 (Donated Embryos) 1,697 (Thawed Embryos) 12,481

Percentage of transfers resulting in live births : (Fresh) 49.2 (Frozen) 43.1 (Donated Embryos) 42.8 (Thawed Embryos) 46.2



Total Live Births : (Fresh) 1,548 (Frozen) 1,298 (Donated Embryos) 726 (Thawed Embryos) 5,766

TOTAL births by Donor Egg/Embryos (all ages) : 9,338

Source: www.Sartcorsonline.com

Picture credit: CDC.gov
How old were the women who used ART in the United States in 2017?Figure 3: The largest group of women using ART services were women younger than age 35. These women represented approximately 38% of all ART cycles performed in 2017. About 20% of ART cycles were performed among women aged 35–37, 19% among women aged 38–40, 10% among women aged 41–42, 7% among women aged 43–44, and 6% among women older than age 44. The average age of women using ART services in 2017 was 36.

How did the types of ART cycles used in the United States differ among women of different ages?
Figure 4 shows that, in 2017, the percentage of ART cycles in which a woman used her own eggs declined with age, while the percentage of ART cycles using a donor egg increased with age. The vast majority (96%) of women younger than age 35 used their own eggs (nondonor), and about 4% used donor eggs. In contrast, 35% of women aged 43–44 and 68% of women older than age 44 used donor eggs.

Was the use of donor eggs or embryos higher among older women undergoing ART?
The percentage of cycles performed with donor eggs increased sharply after age 40. Among women older than age 48, for example, approximately 86% of all ART cycles used donor eggs. Eggs produced by women in older age groups form embryos that are less likely to implant and more likely to result in miscarriage if they do implant.

Number of live-birth deliveries to women using Donor Egg older than 44 in 2017: 654

Source: CDC.gov/art

So the updated quote will become:

"In 2018, there were 126,956 live births in the United States to women ages 40 through 54 -- 959 of those live births to women 50-54.
In 2017, there were only 654 live births to women over 43, using donor eggs."
Image: Kenyan Kiss, by Amanda Kline on freeimages

Found this post by Ally (Ocelot Cub) on FertilityFriends.co.uk:

Ally wrote: I have collected a number of success stories from ladies with high FSH/ low AMH who have fallen pregnant. When I have really low days I get out the file and re-read the stories, I find it such a tonic so I wanted to share it.....

[Note not all stories are about over 40 women]

FSH 96 - Irregular Cycles - Diet and Acupuncture

43 Years old - FSH 35

FSH 94.4 - Dr. Check

FSH 110 - Pregnant

AMH 0.1 - Irregular Cycle

FSH 178 - 3 Babies

Low AMH 0.4 ng/l pregnant with Clearblue Fertility Monitor

Pregnant naturally while waiting for DE

FSH 32 - Elevated Estradiol / High FSH

World's Oldest Natural Mum (59) Conceives While on HRT!

Pregnant while on HRT

Pregnancies in ladies with undetectable AMH

No period and FSH 124

FSH 128 on HRT

FSH in 40's

Spreadsheet of Pregnancies Various High FSH

High FSH levels and Natural pregnancy

FSH of 29 and got a BFP this morning


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility, by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller. Publisher: Findhorn Press; Pap/DVD edition (October 7, 2011)
The Infertility Cleanse: Detox, Diet and Dharma for Fertility
by Tami Quinn and Beth Heller

-- Women who are trying to conceive will find a holistic approach in this hands-on manual.

Step-by-step guidelines help implement a three-part program — of yoga, hypoallergenic and anti-inflammatory nutrition, and stress-reduction techniques — to cleanse the body, mind, and spirit in preparation for pregnancy.

In addition, this program draws on cleansing methods from traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda and has been specifically designed for women who are trying naturally or with assisted-reproduction plans.

Also based on new clinical research that suggests that gut health, chronic inflammation, and environmental toxins may be root causes of infertility, this important book offers all women a natural, holistic approach to readying the womb for a child.

📚 Paperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Infertility Cleanse

📚 Start reading The Infertility Cleanse on your Kindle in under a minute!

📚 Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: People bebe grandmother faces family happy, by CESAR AUGUSTO RAMIREZ VALLEJO on Pixabay
Menopause is the time in a woman's life when her reproductive system shuts down and her reproducing days are over... or are they? For some women, pregnancy is still a concern during menopause.

How is this possible? There may be more than one factor that plays a role in the possibility. For this reason, the best way to understand how pregnancy can occur during menopause is to understand what happens to a woman's body during this change of life.

For starters, menopause occurs when a woman has gone 12 consecutive months without a period cycle. The lack of menses is a sign that estrogen and progesterone production has stopped. The ceasing of these hormones means that the ovaries will no longer produce eggs.

However, sometimes, even though a woman is menopausal, she may still produce enough estrogen for an egg to be implanted within the uterus lining.

The reason why hormone production can still occur is due to the fact that menopause is not characterized by a single event. It is better described as a process that takes place over a few years.

Therefore, it is not unheard of for a woman to have fluctuating hormones for as many as five years after she becomes menopausal. At any time during this five year period when hormones are unpredictable, it's possible for a woman to become pregnant during menopause.

Thus, if there is no other reason why a woman cannot become pregnant (I.E. previous hysterectomy or medical condition), she may want to consider talking to her doctor about birth control during menopause if pregnancy is a concern.

Women cannot become pregnant naturally when they are post-menopausal (after they have completed menopause). This is because they no longer produce the hormones that are required for menses to take place.

Women who believe they have become pregnant after menopause actually became pregnant during menopause because it is not possible to become pregnant without medical intervention after menopause. It is simply impossible because pregnancy can only occur if estrogen and progesterone are being produced.

Women who have experienced early menopause (usually before the age of 45) and who had difficulty becoming pregnant or wished to start a family later on in life, can still become pregnant with hormone therapy during menopause and through an egg donation procedure after menopause.

However, it is important for women who are of older reproducing age (I.E. 35 and up) to understand that there are certain risks involved in becoming pregnant.

Women who become pregnant during menopause are at a greater risk for pregnancy loss, infection, hemorrhaging, embolisms, gastrointestinal diabetes and developing hypertension disorders. In addition, strokes, seizures, and eclampsia are also risk factors for older pregnant women.

Furthermore, medical research has discovered that 40-year-old women put themselves at high risk of developing these health conditions if they become pregnant, and the risk grows even higher with each passing year after 40.

As you can see, although it is rare for a woman to become pregnant during menopause, it is plausible. That being said, pregnant menopausal women need to be kept under the watchful eye of their doctor to protect the health of the expectant mother and the heath of her unborn fetus.

Keep in mind that while a woman can become pregnant during menopause this is a rare occurrence. Therefore, despite what you may read in magazine articles or online if you have concerns about becoming pregnant, or suspect that you are pregnant, the best person to speak with for advice is your doctor or gynecologist.

About the Author: By Kathryn Whittaker.
Sign up for a free newsletter and discover how to banish unpleasant menopause symptoms fast.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
The Infertility Cure: The Ancient Chinese Wellness Program for Getting Pregnant and Having Healthy Babies
by Randine Lewis

-- Infertility affects one out of six couples today.

Dr. Lewis presents a groundbreaking alternative approach to infertility, explaining how she used traditional Chinese medicine to treat her own infertility, successfully conceiving and giving birth to two children.

In Lewis's experience, women who have undergone three to six months of the dietary changes, herbs and acupuncture treatments become pregnant with no further effort.

Lewis intersperses her somewhat technical examination of the program with anecdotes about her patients, weaving in discussions on diet, herbal supplements, acupuncture, older women and problems related to infertility.

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