Amazon.com lists over 8,000 items under the search term "fertility"
Image: 3 Trends That Will Transform Fertility Success Rates The Council of Physicians and Scientists, an invitation-only event sponsored by IntegraMed (integramed.com), concluded their annual conference following three full days of discussion about the emerging technologies and trends in fertility care.

More than 100 reproductive endocrinologists, lab directors and scientists attended the 16th annual conference which was held in Dallas, Texas.

“We are proud to be in our sixteenth year with C.O.P.S.” said Joe Travia, C.O.P.S. Vice Chairman and Senior Vice President, Eastern Region for IntegraMed Fertility.

“By bringing together the nation’s thought-leaders in reproductive endocrinology, we remain on the forefront of advancements that support our commitment to provide patients the best possible fertility care and treatment options at our IntegraMed Fertility centers.”

C.O.P.S. is co-chaired by Dr. John A. Schnorr, of the Southeastern Fertility Center, located near Charleston, SC.

This year we focused on three transformational technologies and topics that we are confident will positively impact the future of fertility, said Dr. Schnorr.

The three trends in fertility treatment are:

1. Improved pregnancy rates with decreased multiple rates through metabolomics.
With metabolomics, embryo quality can now be evaluated non-invasively to more accurately measure their quality. In doing so, only the most viable embryo needs to be transplanted rather than multiple embryos, thus improving pregnancy rates while significantly reducing the instances of multiples through in vitro fertilization (IVF).

2. Use of vitrification technology to successfully freeze eggs.
One of the most exciting and long-awaited advances in fertility preservation is the ability to successfully freeze eggs via a technology called vitrification. Through vitrification, eggs are plunged in liquid nitrogen and instantly frozen, ensuring that this largely water-based cell does not form crystals that would expand and disrupt the egg's membrane.

Dr. Schnorr predicts that within the next three to four years about 25% of all fertility preservation will utilize vitrification.

3. Improvement in the evaluation and treatment of severe male-factor infertility.
Today 40 percent of infertility problems are attributed to the man. Procedures to improve the evaluation, risk assessment and treatment of severe male-factor infertility were discussed.

C.O.P.S. embraces the spirit of collaboration and the exchange of ideas. Collectively we can accomplish more than we would ever be able to achieve individually, concluded Dr. Schnorr. That's what C.O.P.S. is all about.

About C.O.P.S.:
Sixteen years ago, IntegraMed formed the Council of Physicians and Scientists (C.O.P.S.) as a means for physicians and scientists from the IntegraMed Fertility Network, as well as specialists within the field of reproductive endocrinology from around the world, to meet and learn about advancements in fertility care. Physicians and scientists can earn Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits while at C.O.P.S.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Surviving In-vitro Fertilization: IVF Stories and Inspiration from the Women who have been there, by Karen Daniels. Publisher: CreateSpace (July 29, 2011)Surviving In-vitro Fertilization: IVF Stories and Inspiration from the Women who have been there
by Karen Daniels

-- True IVF stories and inspiration from the women who have been there.

In-vitro fertilization is not a journey you need to take alone.

The women in this book who share their stories, thoughts, and lessons learned, have been in the IVF trenches - some for long periods of time.

We call them the IVF veterans.

They've struggled, cried, laughed, and inspired.

Let their experience guide you through the process, and use their knowledge and tips as a beacon of insight for your own journey.

In-vitro fertilization is, on your best days, a journey empowering you toward your ultimate goal of being a mom.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 117 pages
Click to order/for more info: Surviving In-vitro Fertilization

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Surviving In-vitro Fertilization on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Cold Clock, by Marcelo Gerpe on FreeImage
Photo Credit: by Cold Clock, by Marcelo Gerpe
AMH [Anti-Mullerian Hormone test] assessment is also useful in fertility assessment as it provides a guide to ovarian reserve, and identifies women who may need to consider either egg freezing or trying for a pregnancy sooner rather than later if their long-term future fertility is poor.

Measuring AMH alone may be misleading as high levels occur in conditions like polycystic ovarian syndrome, and therefore AMH levels should be considered in conjunction with a transvaginal scan of the ovaries to assess antral follicle count.

In view of its potential use to assess a woman's ovarian reserve and future fertility, measurement of AMH is sometimes called the biological Body Clock Test.

It also has the potential to rationalize the program of ovulation induction and decisions about the number of embryos to transfer in assisted reproduction techniques to maximize pregnancy success rates whilst minimizing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)

Read More: Anti-Müllerian hormone


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health, by Toni Weschler. Publisher: Collins; 10th anniversary edition (October 31, 2006)Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition:
The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health
by Toni Weschler

-- For any woman unhappy with her current method of birth control; demoralized by her quest to have a baby, or experiencing confusing symptoms in her cycle, this book provides answers to all these questions, plus amazing insights into a woman's body.

Weschler thoroughly explains the empowering Fertility Awareness Method, which in only a couple minutes a day allows a woman to:
• Enjoy highly effective, scientifically proven birth control without chemicals or devices
• Maximize her chances of conception or expedite fertility treatment by identifying impediments to conception
• Increase the likelihood of choosing the gender of her baby
• Gain control of her sexual and gynecological health

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 512 pages
Click to order/for more info: Taking Charge of Your Fertility



Image: Newborn baby, by Joelle Inge-Messerschmidt/www.photographybyjoelle.com, on Flickr
Newborn baby, by Joelle Inge-Messerschmidt/Photographybyjoelle.com
In the Infertility Support forum on TCOYF's [Taking Care of Your Fertility] website, a link to a free PDF manuscript of a very interesting book was posted:

Fertile-vs-Infertile-Book: How infections affect your fertility and your baby's health, by Attila Toth, M.D.

Dr. Toth wrote: If you are in the midst of trying to have a family, this book will help you navigate through reproduction with the optimal possible outcome. If all that is behind you, in reading these pages you will understand why things worked out the way they did — why you never had children or if you had them, why they turned out the way they did.

This book discusses how untreated bacterial infections are often the cause of unexplained infertility, as well as miscarriages, stillbirths, sick babies and even cancer and heart disease.

The post containing this link was in response to a woman who mentioned her unexplained infertility was caused by a bacterial infection diagnosed in her husband's second semen analysis.

Their first doctor only tested for the usual stuff -- volume, motility, morphology.

The second doctor also tested for pathogens and found a raging infection with no symptoms.

This couple conceived immediately after their first round of antibiotics.

They wasted over a year because the first doctor did not test them for bacterial infections.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health, by Toni Weschler. Publisher: Collins; 10th anniversary edition (October 31, 2006)Taking Charge of Your Fertility, 10th Anniversary Edition:
The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health
by Toni Weschler

-- For any woman unhappy with her current method of birth control; demoralized by her quest to have a baby, or experiencing confusing symptoms in her cycle, this book provides answers to all these questions, plus amazing insights into a woman's body.

Weschler thoroughly explains the empowering Fertility Awareness Method, in only a couple minutes a day, allows a woman to:
• Enjoy highly effective, scientifically proven birth control without chemicals or devices
• Maximize her chances of conception or expedite fertility treatment by identifying impediments to conception
• Increase the likelihood of choosing the gender of her baby
• Gain control of her sexual and gynecological health

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 512 pages
Click to order/for more info: Taking Charge of Your Fertility



Image: Life size model of baby at 8 weeks after conception. Photo credit: Bill Davenport (lumix2004) on Free Images

Photo credit: Life size model of baby at 8 weeks after conception
by Bill Davenport
A life-sizets from Yale University, US, have developed a new technique to improve IVF efficiency from a current success rate of around 34 percent, to more than 80 percent in a pilot study.

Fertility clinics usually study newly fertilized embryos under a microscope to determine if they are developing in a normal way, and to see which seem the most likely to successfully implant.

Emre Seli and his team have developed a more advanced method of analyzing which embryos are healthy, by studying cell metabolism

Read more: New techniques improve IVF success rates


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: A Matter of Trust: The Guide to Gestational Surrogacy, by Gail Dutton. Publisher: Clouds Publishing; 1st edition (April 1, 1997)A Matter of Trust: The Guide to Gestational Surrogacy
by Gail Dutton

-- Published in 1997, this book is a step-by-step guide to surrogate parenting.

It discusses finding and working with a surrogate, what a surrogate program provides, what to include in the contracts, recommended testing for potential surrogates, detailed costs for each item related to surrogacy, the medical procedure, medications and their side effects, embryo cryo-preservation, demographics of surrogates and surrogate couples and the effects of surrogacy upon children.

One chapter outlines the laws in U.S. states and in Israel, South Africa, Canada, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany, France, Switzerland, New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, and Russia.

Jewish law also is discussed, along with the views of several Christian denominations, and other religions regarding surrogacy.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 239 pages
Click to order/for more info: A Matter of Trust



Image: Robert Glenn Miller, by Doug Miller /Sensual Shadows Photography, on Flickr
Photo credit: Robert Glenn Miller, by Doug Miller/Sensual Shadows Photography
As a woman who had her first child at age 42 and a second child at age 44, I have come to the realization to remain upbeat and positive, there are three things an expectant first time mom over 40, and women who are considering motherhood over 35, should avoid.

The three things to avoid are:

#1 - Message Boards asking how old is too old to have a baby.

Even now that I have two healthy (thank God) children, ages two and four years old, my spirits can be brought down by reading the postings on many message boards.

Myths on the boards are accepted as truth such as babies born to first-time moms over 35 will be unhealthy or have a major birth defect.

This is so far from the truth, I wrote You Can Have A Healthy Pregnancy Over 35.

Another popular myth that gets a lot of agreement is children of older parents will resent or be ashamed their parents are not the same age as the parents of their friends.

Usually, the adult child of an older parent expresses how ashamed she was as a teenager of her parents' age.

By the time I've completed reading the posting of Miss So-Ashamed I want to say to her, girlfriend, you need a taste of reality. Were you the only one of your friends who was ashamed of her parents?

For every teenager who is ashamed of his older parents, I'll show you another who is ashamed of his younger parents for other reasons.

A teenager may be ashamed because his thirty-something-year-old dad is not as good in athletics as his classmate's dad.

Or a teenager may be ashamed his dad drives a car from prehistoric times, while his classmate's dad drives a car from the future.

A fourteen-year-old teenage girl may be ashamed because her mom is not as slim and as pretty as her best friend's mom.

Or she may be ashamed her mom wore old-fashioned shoes to Parents Day.

#2 - Television and radio shows asking how old is too old to have a baby.

As if it is not bad enough to read the postings of people who believe you shouldn't have a baby a day after your 25th birthday, the television and radio shows bring you voices and faces of people who believe this.

I remember watching a popular talk show comparing the decision of a mom over 40 to have a baby, with the decision of a child under 16 to have a baby.

I felt sorry for the older mom who didn't stand a chance of defending her decision against the obvious disapproval of the savvy television host.

#3 - People who seem to have THE answer to how old is too old to have a baby.

Yes, I have an age limit in the back of my mind I believe is too old to have a baby.

However, because I believe only God can decide how old is too old to have a baby, and He hasn't revealed the answer to me, I leave room for my age limit to be wrong.

If you are an expectant mom over 40, or a woman over 35 considering motherhood, remember to eat healthily, and listen to the advice of your doctor.

And if you want to remain emotionally upbeat, please heed my advice.

Guest Article by Cynthia Wilson James of Copyright 2006 - Cjuliet Publishing


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Baby Business: How Money, Science, and Politics Drive the Commerce of Conception, by Debora L. Spar. Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (February 14, 2006)The Baby Business: How Money, Science, and Politics Drive the Commerce of Conception
by Debora L. Spar

-- Despite legislation that claims to prohibit it, there is a thriving market for babies spreading across the globe.

Fueled by rapid advances in reproductive medicine and the desperate desires of millions of would-be parents, the acquisition of children—whether through donated eggs, rented wombs, or cross-border adoption — has become a multi-billion dollar industry that has left science, law, ethics, and commerce deeply at odds.

In The Baby Business, Debora Spar argues that it is time to acknowledge the commercial truth about reproduction and to establish a standard that governs its transactions.

In this fascinating behind-the-scenes account, she combines pioneering research and interviews with the industry's top reproductive scientists and trailblazers to provide a first glimpse at how the industry works: who the baby-makers are, who makes money, how prices are set, and what defines the clientele.

Fascinating stories illustrate the inner workings of market segments--including stem cell research, surrogacy, egg swapping, designer babies, adoption, and human cloning -- as Spar explores the moral and legal challenges that industry players must address.

The first purely commercial look at an industry that deals in humanity's most intimate issues, this book challenges us to consider the financial promise and ethical perils we'll face as the baby business moves inevitably forward.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comHardcover: 302 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Baby Business



Image: Newborn Baby, by Anita Peppers, on MorgueFile
Photo credit: Newborn Baby, by Anita Peppers
Women who have high levels of vitamin E in their blood during pregnancy, tend to give birth to heavier babies, a new study suggests.

The conclusions suggest vitamin E may have a more significant impact on fetal growth than was previously believed.

During the study, over 1,200 pregnant women were monitored for their vitamin E levels during their 28th week of pregnancy.

What they found was among the women with highest levels of vitamin E, the birth weight of their babies was highest.

They also found these women were three times less likely to have low birth weight babies than those with the lowest concentration of vitamin E.

However, the scientists did say it was not clear the vitamin E levels were not a marker of other factors promoting fetal development, such as a healthy diet.

They also said they are as yet not recommending pregnant women take any additional vitamin E, then what is contained in prenatal vitamins.

In fact, they say excessive levels of vitamin E have actually been linked to pregnancy complications, such as low birth weight babies.

Source: IOL.co.za


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Fertility and Conception: A Complete Guide to Getting Pregnant, by Zita West. Publisher: DK ADULT; 1st edition (December 15, 2003)Fertility and Conception: A Complete Guide to Getting Pregnant
by Zita West

-- Aimed at couples that are planning to start a family, from those who have already experienced problems conceiving to those who have only recently decided to have a baby, Fertility and Conception is loaded with advice and up-to-date information on maximizing fertility.

Bridging the gap between conventional and complimentary treatments, the book offers a unique approach to fertility by offering Plan A, a 4-week preconception program of diet and complimentary therapies, and Plan B, which focuses on combining conventional treatments such as IVF, with complimentary treatments.

In clear, easy-to-understand prose, the author provides cutting-edge information on all the latest fertility tests and treatments and offers advice on how to achieve healthy ovulation through diet, correct hormone balance, and reducing the effects of disorders that derail fertility.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: Fertility and Conception



Image: Sperm Count Recipe Ayurvedic, by Kamikaze Gecko on Flickr
Photo credit: Sperm Count Recipe Ayurvedic, by Kamikaze Gecko
This plan can help many over 40 women:

If you don't have fertile-quality cervical mucus, the sperm may only last 2 hours.
Older men sometimes can't perform as often.
Older men sometimes have lower sperm counts.
The sperm needs to be there, waiting, before your egg is released. So you need to start trying before your OPK turns positive.
Regular sex increases his testosterone, his sperm count, and your cervical mucus and helps ramp up your hormones, especially estrogen - getting everything working well.

The Plan - Short Version:
"Try" every other night starting Day 8
Buy 10 ovulation predictor kit sticks
Begin ovulation testing on Day 10
When test is positive, try that night, plus two additional nights in a row
Skip one night, then do one last try
Take a home pregnancy test 15 days after your ovulation test was positive, if your period has not begun
If your ovulation test never goes positive, continue trying every other night until Day 35, then do a pregnancy test if your period has not begun.

For the Detailed Version, read the full article: The Sperm Meets Egg Plan

How Sexual Frequency Affects a Woman's Sexual Responsiveness, Fertility, and Health

The less often a woman has sex, the less she will want sex, the less she will enjoy sex, and the more difficult it will be for her to become aroused and climax.

Women who had sex two or more times a week had the most regular cycles, women who had sex once a week was slightly less regular, celibate women were still less regular, and women who had sporadic sex, or sex less than once a week, had the most irregular cycles. A variety of hormonal differences were seen, including higher estrogen levels in the women who had regular sex.

The benefits of the hormonal changes in those having intercourse at least twice a week include better fertility, stronger bones, better cardiovascular health, less depression, lower incidence of fibrocystic breast disease and uterine cancer, and a decrease in menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and depression.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Sperm Meets Egg Plan: Getting Pregnant Faster, by Deanna Roy. Published: Casey Shay Press (October 9, 2012)The Sperm Meets Egg Plan: Getting Pregnant Faster
by Deanna Roy
-- The Sperm Meets Egg Plan is a step-by-step guide to achieving pregnancy without taking invasive tests, charting temperatures, or making mistakes in predicting your ovulation that result in mistimed attempts at fertilization.

Designed by Deanna Roy after months of trying made her believe she had a fertility problem, the plan will help you time intercourse whether you have a typical or atypical cycle.

It includes adjustments for common fertility problems, what to do if you are over forty, and considerations for trying again after a pregnancy loss.

This booklet includes 40 pages of instruction plus a 10-page sneak peek of Deanna's book Baby Dust. It should be a free download.

This FREE booklet is a THANK YOU to all the women who have supported Deanna's web site since the loss of her first baby in 1998.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading The Sperm Meets Egg Plan on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Tips on Getting Pregnant: a Day to Day Guide to your Cycle and Ovulation
Let's take a look at your menstrual cycle as you move through the month.

The following ovulation calendar is based on a 28 day cycle, so if your cycle is a bit longer or shorter, please adjust accordingly (for some help here, visit our online ovulation calendar).

We take you through your cycle day-by-day and interject a few points and tips (like when to start ovulation testing or how to interpret changes in cervical mucus - a natural fertility symptom).Image: Tips on Getting Pregnant: a Day to Day Guide to your Cycle and Ovulation


Get Pregnant Tip #2 Start Fertility Chart: A fertility chart will be the cornerstone of your trying to conceive efforts - a daily ovulation calendar where you record your fertility signs, your daily basal temperature (more on that below), the results of ovulation tests or fertility monitors, and when you made love.

A fertility chart will help you predict when you ovulate - your most fertile time to get pregnant.


Read more: Read the full article



TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Ordinary Miracles: A Journey through Primary and Secondary Infertility, by Krissi Marie McVicker. Publisher: iUniverse.com (March 27, 2012)Ordinary Miracles: A Journey through Primary and Secondary Infertility
by Krissi Marie McVicker

-- We had trouble conceiving and it was shocking news.

When we found out in-vitro fertilization would most likely be our only chance for success, our anxiety grew.

But, with the help of my husband's amazing insurance, after three cycles, we were able to have our daughter, Ella.

And after three more cycles, our twins Logan and Mia graced us with their presence and we were truly blessed.

I know that we were one of the lucky couples. Many people can't afford one IVF cycle, let alone six.

And, I've never taken that for granted.

After my daughter was born, I started writing Ordinary Miracles. I wanted to share my story with others because I remember hearing success stories when I was in the midst of my struggle, and it inspired me to believe if it could happen to them, maybe, it would happen for me too.

After my twins were born, I started my blog: Stress-Free Infertility. I wanted a place on the Internet where couples could go to and read about others, get solicited advice, and be inspired by other success stories; a place to ease the stress of infertility, at least a little bit.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 216 pages
Click to order/for more info: Ordinary Miracles

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Ordinary Miracles on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Image: Mom and Daughter Shopping. Photo Credit: Dia German on freeimages
Photo Credit: Mom and Daughter Shopping, by Dia German
If your pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, does just being an older mom put you at risk for complications at birth?

Some would tell you that it does, but how much is simply the doctor's attitude against older women in general?

How much is caused by the doctor's interference during labor?

Yes, there CAN be increased risks due to your age and health status.

But plenty of older moms have complication-free births, even with first babies.

It is not up to anybody else to decide if she should be allowed to have a a child at her advanced age.

From Home Birth Reference Site:
Where there are no tangible medical complications of pregnancy, the risks of childbirth in older women are no greater than in younger women
- Editorial, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,
Volume 108, Issue 9, September 2001
Our fears concerning increasing maternal age in pregnancy arose from unsophisticated surveys conducted many years ago which showed an apparent increase in risk; these surveys did not have the capacity to adjust adequately for confounding variables. Yet the teaching is handed down, that older women are at a higher risk in pregnancy and childbirth.

- Editor's Choice, by John M Grant
British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume 108, Issue 9, September 2001


Read more: Home Birth Reference Site


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Hannah's Hope: Seeking God's Heart in the Midst of Infertility, Miscarriage, and Adoption Loss, by Jennifer Saake. Published: NavPress (February 1, 2014)Hannah's Hope: Seeking God's Heart in the Midst of Infertility, Miscarriage, and Adoption Loss
by Jennifer Saake
-- Hannah's heart beat with a mother's love long before she was blessed with a child.

Through the years of waiting and longing, her gentle heart was nearly crushed under the weight of grief.

You can meet Hannah in the pages of 1 Samuel, chapters 1 and 2.

The Bible says she was barren, and we know she suffered heartache, anguish, and grief because of her empty arms. Perhaps you do too.

Hannah's Hope is for all who long for a child yet to be conceived, grieve for a baby too soon passed from the womb, or have lived through the no-mans-land of a failed adoption.

It is intended as a guide to assist you in making wise decisions as you struggle through your grief. And by the end of the journey, God may surprise you by the ways He uses to answer your heart's cry.

Compassionately written by a woman who knows well these painful struggles, Hannah's Hope will direct you to the Source of strength, whose name is the God of all comfort.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 160 pages
Click to order/for more info: Hannah's Hope

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Hannah's Hope on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.



Popular Posts